Top 4 Frequently Asked Questions About Arrests

The arrest process is complicated and stressful for people who are going through it for the first time. Usually, the detainee’s family has lots of questions about when their loved one will be released and what the long-term consequences will be. Here are the answers to four of the most commonly asked questions about getting arrested.

1. When Can Suspects Leave Jail?

The police sometimes release people that they arrest without pressing charges because there is not enough evidence or because someone else has confessed to the crime in question. Other times, suspects must stay in jail until it’s time to go to the courthouse for their trials. If detainees or their families can purchase bail bonds near me Allentown PA, then suspects can leave jail until their trial begins. Unless the police have decided not to press charges, though, there is always a chance that suspects will have to return to prison following their trials.

2. When Do the Police Have to Read Suspects Their Miranda Rights?

Contrary to popular opinion, the police do not have to read all detainees their Miranda rights. However, if they want to interrogate suspects, they must read out these rights before the interrogation begins. Otherwise, anything that suspects reveal during the questioning process is not valid evidence. 

3. When Are Warrants Needed?

If the police want to arrest suspects in their own houses, they must receive warrants from a judge first. These documents include the times that the police may make arrests, the bail that the defendants need to leave jail, and the crimes of which the defendants are accused. If the police make arrests in public and have probable cause for their actions, they do not need warrants.

4. What Happens if Suspects Refuse To Talk?

Sometimes, suspects remain silent throughout the entire questioning process, refusing to answer any of the police’s questions or provide an alibi. While this tactic is within suspects’ rights, it is not always the best course of action. When suspects refuse to answer questions before they are arrested, their refusal can be used as evidence during their trials. On the other hand, if suspects stay silent during an official interrogation after hearing their Miranda rights, their silence does not count as evidence.

The criminal justice process takes a long time and involves many detailed laws. Whenever suspects or their families have case-specific questions, it is always a good idea to contact a lawyer.